COLOR/FORMS, Parsons & Cooper Hewitt Grad Symposium (April 2015; New York, NY)

CALL FOR PAPERS:
Color/Forms

The Twenty-Fourth Annual Parsons/Cooper Hewitt Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Design

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, New York.
April 23 and 24, 2015.

Deadline for proposals: January 26, 2015

This symposium is seeking papers on the forms color takes and the roles color plays in the meanings of design and the decorative arts since the Renaissance. We are especially interested in research that touches on moments of change: for example, on transitions from monochrome to full-color production, or when particular colors became available, fashionable or unfashionable.

Coloration is intrinsic to the social meanings of objects. Colors shape our interaction with things and other people in fundamental ways; they can appeal to our most visceral senses of pleasure or desire. Colors affect behaviors, and we use colors metaphorically to describe attitudes, feelings and moods. In the world of consumer goods, the need to produce certain colors has driven innovations in mechanical processes, and markets can rise and fall based on color trends.

Areas of investigation might involve:

  • Graphic design and broadcast media–e.g. color printing in lithographs, newspapers and magazines; day-glo color inks and psychedelic design; Technicolor and other cinematic color systems; the advent of color television; etc.
  • Fashion and costume studies–e.g. color, or lack thereof, in menswear; aniline dyes and other technologies of coloration; color forecasting; etc.
  • Industrial design–e.g. colored plastics; anodized aluminum; the color of high technology (silver, black, white, beige) or domestic appliances; color theory and consumer choice; color-customizable products; colors in toys; etc.
  • Decorative arts–e.g. hand-painted and printed colors ceramics; tapestry, color-changing fabrics and other textiles; polychromy in sculpture; etc.
  • Architecture and interior design–e.g. colored exterior lighting; psychologies of colored interiors; wallpapers; “white cities” and exhibition architecture; etc.
  • …or any number of related fields of production and consumption.

Proposals are welcome from graduate students at any level in fields such as History of the Decorative Arts, History of Design, Curatorial Studies, Design Studies, Art History, History of Architecture, Design and Technology, Media Studies, Consumer Studies, Cultural Anthropology, Sociology, and other fields.

The symposium’s Catherine Hoover Voorsanger Keynote speaker will be Jeffrey L. Meikle, Stiles Professor in American Studies and Professor of Art History at the University of Texas at Austin, speaking on “Postcard Modernism: Landscapes, Cityscapes, and American Visual Culture, 1931-1950.” Dr. Meikle is one of the leading voices in design history and cultural history. His renown scholarship extends to industrial design and technology, popular print media, and alternative cultures from 1950 to the present. His books include Twentieth Century Limited: Industrial Design in America, 1925-1939 (1982); American Plastic: A Cultural History (1995); and Design in the USA (2005).

The Keynote will be on Thursday evening, April 23, 2015 and the symposium sessions will be in the morning and afternoon on Friday, April 24.

To submit a proposal, send a two-page abstract, one-page bibliography and a c.v. to:

Ethan Robey
Associate Director, MA Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies
robeye@newschool.edu

Deadline for proposals: January 26, 2015

The symposium is sponsored by the MA Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered jointly by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and Parsons The New School for Design

Final Call: Fashion and Gender Symposium (due 9 January)

Dates: 1-2 May 2015
Location: University of Minnesota, USA
Website: http://design.umn.edu/fashionand/gender/
Deadline for proposals: 9 January 2015.

The University of Minnesota [USA] will present a symposium on Fashion and Gender to be held May 1-2, 2015. This symposium is the fourth in a symposium series entitled “Fashion And … ” connecting fashion with other themes of importance in today’s world. Members attending the symposia of Fashion And… examine the interconnections and intersections of fashion in today’s world.

Read more of this post

craft+design enquiry #8: Global Parallels: Production and Craft in Fashion and Industrial Design Industries (2016)

Website: http://craftdesignenquiry.blogspot.com.au/p/blog-page_13.html
Deadline for expressions of interest: 30 April 2015

The craft + design enquiry Editorial Board welcomes Tiziana Ferrero-Regis, Rafael Gomez and Kathleen Horton, from Queensland University of Technology, as the Guest Editors of c+de#8 with the theme of ‘Global Parallels: Production and Craft in Fashion and Industrial Design Industries’.

Contributors to c+de#8 are invited to submit Expressions of Interest for either the Themed Section or the Open Section by following the Steps to Submitting a Paper outlined at the website.

Expressions of Interest close on 30 April 2015. For contributors invited to submit papers, the deadline for full papers is 30 June 2015. c+de#8 will be published in mid-2016.

Please refer to the website for further details.

Fashion and Gender (May 2015, University of Minnesota USA)

Dates: 1-2 May 2015
Location: University of Minnesota, USA
Website: http://design.umn.edu/fashionand/gender/
Deadline for proposals: 9 January 2015.

The University of Minnesota [USA] is organizing a symposium entitled Fashion and Gender to be held May 1-2, 2015. This symposium is the fourth in a symposium series entitled “Fashion And … ” connecting fashion with other themes of importance in today’s world. Members attending the symposia of Fashion And… examine the interconnections and intersections of fashion in today’s world.

Read more of this post

Call for Papers / Designs for the 2014 Fashion And Gender SYMPOSIUM May 1-2, 2015, St. Paul, Minnesota

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 12.11.19 PM

This symposium is the fourth in a symposium series entitled “Fashion And … ” connecting fashion with other themes of importance in today’s world. Members attending the symposia of Fashion And… examine the interconnections and intersections of fashion in today’s world.

Crane (2000, p. 16) noted that “fashionable clothes are used to make statements about social class and social identity but their principle messages are about the ways in which men women and men perceive their gender roles or are expected to perceive them.” Thus, for our fourth symposium we focus on relationships between fashion and gender.

Read more of this post

Fashion Thinking – Theory, History, Practice (Oct 2014, Denmark)

Dates: 30 October – 1 November 2014
Location: University of Southern Denmark
Website: http://www.sdu.dk/en/Om_SDU/Institutter_centre/Idk/Arrangementer/FASHION+THINKING
Deadline for submission of abstracts: 1 May 2014

Over the past 20 years, Fashion Studies has established itself as a significant, trans- disciplinary field of research covering a range of topics and methodologies. The conference Fashion Thinking wishes to mark this development with an international conference that explores and challenges the theory, history and practice of Fashion Thinking in it widest sense as paradigms of critical thought and creative practice. Fashion is here understood both as material objects and the process involved in producing and consuming fashion including logics of gender, age, culture, status and sexuality within a historical and contemporary context.

Read more of this post

CFP: The Hand and the Machine: Tensions in Interwar Design (SECAC, Sarasota FL – October 2014)

Venue: Southeastern College Art Conference

Dates: October 8-11, 2014
Location: Sarasota, Florida
Website: http://www.secollegeart.org/conference#papers
Deadline for submissions: April 20, 2014

The story is familiar: modernism’s post-World War I fascination with machines and technology – in architecture, industrial design, the decorative arts, and fashion – dissipated in the 1930s, replaced by a valorization of handicraft and a reemergence of the human subject. Where the machine aesthetic dominated design in the early 1920s, artists grew disenchanted with the signs of industry in the 1930s, focusing instead on the human subject, and crafting work to show the “hand” of the maker.  But is this tale of a “return to the hand” universally true? Are there certain mediums or national traditions that trouble the story?  This session solicits papers that examine the precarious dynamics of industry and the hand-made in the applied arts between the wars. We encourage a variety of perspectives within or beyond the powerhouse industrial economies of the West, and we hope, through the breadth of papers, to reassess the standard narrative of interwar design.

Session Co-Chairs: Toby Norris, Assumption College and Rachael Barron-Duncan, Central Michigan University.

Contact: tnorris@assumption.edu

19th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference: Design Management in an Era of Disruption (Sep 2014, London UK)

Dates: 2-4 September 2014
Location: London, UK
Website: http://www.dmi.org/academic2014
Deadline for submission of abstracts: 15 January 2014

Design Management in an Era of Disruption
Hosted by the London College of Fashion

The Design Management Institute has issued a call for papers for the 19th Academic Design Management Conference to be held in London, UK September 2–4, 2014. We welcome early-career researchers and PhD candidates with work in progress. We are also seeking those interested in conducting workshops.

The theme of the conference is Design Management in an Era of Disruption. The management of design has arguably never played such an important role as it does today. Changes to the business and social environment are making consumers more knowledgeable and discerning. Innovations and developments in new technologies make it possible to respond to these demands in the form of mass-niche, mass-customized, or micro-niche product strategies, leading to changes in business models and the location of manufacturing as consumers increasingly participate in the product design and development process. These are all indicative of major disruptions to the ways that products and services are designed, made, and distributed. The role of the designer is in many contexts transformed. The purpose of this conference is to explore how design management is changing in this era of disruption.

Read more of this post

Final Call for Papers / Designs for the 2014 Fashion And Communication SYMPOSIUM May 2-3, 2014, St. Paul, Minnesota

Fashion is change and because it is change, fashion impacts nearly every aspect of our lives from the language we speak, the furniture we use, the homes we live in, the cars we drive, the clothes we wear, and the food we eat. Fashion also reflects social consensus and to achieve consensus we must have communication. Thus, for  our third symposium we focus on relationships between fashion and communication. We are interested in providing opportunities to share research findings, innovative teaching strategies, and designs that explore and investigate issues related to communication and fashion.

The symposium has an inclusive definition of the term “fashion”. While fashion is often understood to center on apparel choices, fashion can be recognized as the current style or way of behaving in any field. Thus, proposals are welcome from divergent fields such as architecture, anthropology, cultural studies, history, interior design, graphic design, psychology, sociology, and women’s studies among others.

Read more of this post

Shapeshifting: Transformative Paradigms of Fashion and Textile Design (April 2014, Aukland NZ)

Dates: 14-16 April 2014
Location: Aukland University of Technology, NZ
Contacts: http://www.shapeshifting.aut.ac.nz/
Deadline for submission of abstracts: 30 September 2013

In September 2011 the fashion theorist and practitioner, Otto von Busch, delivered a paper at the ISEA conference in Istanbul. Its title alerts us to something immediately contemporary and vitally important in developing a perspective on fashion practices and theories. Von Busch abuts the three words ‘fashion’, ‘hacking’ and ‘shapeshifting’ in a way that points to some paradigmatic shift in how we now have to find our bearings with technologies, clothing and cultures. Von Busch opens his ISEA presentation, “Fashion Hacking as Shapeshifting” with the simple and direct observation: “Fashion is transformation. It is a promise of becoming a vessel of shapeshifting, a craft with which we can navigate across the currents of the social.” It is a promise. This suggests, as with all promises, it is futural, to be accomplished. And like all promises, we always run the risk of this promise being broken, its un-fulfillment. Between transformations, promises and shapeshiftings we are disposed and composed to all of the risks that go by the name ‘fashion’. Shapeshifting is a capacity or potential of sentient beings, a capability of organisms to auto-transformations, as responsive agency to their setting.

Read more of this post

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,305 other followers

%d bloggers like this: